In our goal to continually improve the services we provide, we would like to get your insights on the second part of the online seminar on Commercial Production of Cheese from Goat, Buffalo, and Cow's Milk with Dr. Olive Emata you attended. Your views and comments will really help us make our upcoming online seminars and events even more useful and relevant. Please let us know what you think. You can say as little or as much as you'd like.

For those who wish to obtain a certificate of participation, kindly also provide us your email address, where we will send the certificate, through the online evaluation form.

In our goal to continually improve the services we provide, we would like to get your insights on the second part of the online seminar on Commercialization of Tilapia Ice Cream and Cookies with Dana Vera Cruz of Central Luzon State University (CLSU); and Demo on How to Make Instant Goat Papaitan and Bakkwa with Venus Quines of CLSU you attended. Your views and comments will really help us make our upcoming online seminars and events even more useful and relevant. Please let us know what you think. You can say as little or as much as you'd like.

For those who wish to obtain a certificate of participation, kindly also provide us your email address, where we will send the certificate, through the online evaluation form.

Filipinos have impeccable taste and it shows even to the simplest “pulutan.” In an occasion where eating isn’t even the main activity, the food still has to be delicious. In Northern Luzon, a favorite partner for a round of drinks are chevon or goat’s meat dishes. Ask anyone from Ilocos Norte and they would tell you that no birthday or funeral is complete without Papaitan, Kaldereta, or Kinilaw na Kambing. It’s no wonder the Ilocos region is among the top producers of goat and goat-based products.

 

Because we live in such a fast paced world, the locals who once enjoyed eating goat’s meat at home in the province may have likely moved to the city or even overseas, the laid back provincial lifestyle was traded in for a busy and frantic urban hustle.

 

What still remains is a longing for a taste of home. So the folks from Central Luzon, a region that also has a growing goat production industry, set out to bring beloved homemade goat dishes to the city.

 

According to Ms. Venus Quines from the Department of Food Science and Technology of Central Luzon State University, goat’s meat may be popular among those who eat it as pulutan, but as processed, ready-to-eat products, such form has not yet been properly developed. CLSU has therefore placed themselves to be among the universities at the forefront of further realizing the profitability of chevon through product development. “Together we can claim na sa goat, may kita.” says Ms. Quines.

 

This year, CLSU unveiled three new and innovative chevon-based products through the BAR funded research entitled “Enhancement if Innovative Chevon-Based Products Towards Commercialization.”

 

CLSU saw that the time was ripe to bring chevon-based products not only to the local market but also internationally. Both Central Luzon and Northern Luzon had earlier began improving the practice of goat-raising through the R&D efforts done by BAR. According to Dr. Alma De Leon, from the Department of Food Science and Technology in CLSU’s College of Home Science and Industry, “Some of CLSU’s R and D activities supported by DA to improve goat production are the breed improvement through the three-way-cross goats and mutton commercialization.” Now that the supply of goat’s meat were improved it was only natural to begin building product-based enterprises.

 

Aside from the development of local goat production Central Luzon, another reason why CLSU ventured into chevon food processing is the increasing awareness of consumers to be more health conscious. When compared to traditional protein sources such as poultry, pork, or beef, goats meat has the lowest total fat, saturated fat and cholesterol. Chevon also contains higher levels of iron and protein compared to equal portions of other cooked meat.

 

CLSU’s project developed the following products: Instant Chevon Papaitan, Chevon Jerky which they branded as Bak-wa, and Instant Kapukan. From the recipe, to the business mode, to consumer feedback, to the packaging, CLSU’s project identified and enhanced the production process of the ready-to-eat chevon products.

 

Earlier on during the study, CLSU conducted a survey in 10 towns within Nueva Ecijah through self-administered questionnaires. The survey helped determine the most popular chevon dishes among consumers as well as served relevant baseline information for the university to come up with a marketing strategy. Based on the results of the study, the 3 most popular dishes were Papaitan, Kapukan and caldereta.

 

Prototypes of these products were then made as part of the undergraduate thesis of the BS in Food Technology students. They used various kitchen recipes in cooking these dishes for the initial formulations and developed specific protocols to stabilize the products. Resulting prototypes were then subjected to consumer testing and the most acceptable ones were used in the pilot production operation of the study.

      

Instant Papaitan is a take-off from the traditional Papaitan which is a native delicacy from Northern Luzon. The chevon meat is dehydrated and placed inside a sealed container for longer shelf life that lasts for six months. The spices and seasoning have already been incorporated to the chevon bits and all one needs to do is boil the dehydrated chevon bits for ten minutes.

 

Instant Kapukan follows a similar concept but the goat’s meat for this particular dish is tenderized and grilled goat’s skin. Kapukan is a salad (ceviche) while Papaitan is a stew. Both are sour but Papaitan has bitter notes in its taste. Instant Kapukan can be conveniently consumed by boiling the dehydrated chevon skin bits for 10 minutes and then drained. After which it is spiked with mixture calamansi and ginger juice, finely chopped dehydrated onions, bell pepper and chili pepper which are also found in the packaging container.

 

Probably the most unique of the bunch is the Chevon Jerky or Bak-wa. Bak-wa is a Chinese meat snack made up of the ground goat’s meat spiced with salt and chilli, marinated for two days, made flat against a sheet tray, dried and cut to pieces around an inch wide. After drying, staff at CLSU’s food laboratory would coat the flattened chevon first in mango puree before packaging them in vacuum sealed ziplock containers that keep the products fresh for six months. One just has to pop them out and eat the chevon jerky off its packaging, no cooking needed.

 

CLSU is currently working on developing a fourth instant chevon dish. “We have come up with the prototype of binalot na kalderetang kambing. However, the vacuum packed chevon binalot needs to be packed and sterilized in a food processing facility in Metro Manila.   Due to the distance of our University to the food processing facility, the team decided to process vacuum-packed restructured chevon tapa instead,” says Dr. De Leon.

 

CLSU, through its Technology Transfer Office headed by Dr. Pablo Rafael, is offering the technology they have developed in processing instant-chevon products to private individuals who are interested in starting a business on chevon products.

 

As of July of 2018, CLSU has been selling their instant chevon products on campus: at Dairy Box located at the PCC Compound and at U-Mart. Papaitan and Kapukan are sold at PhP150.00/ 50 gram pack while Bak-kwa is being sold at PhP 250.00/100 gram pack. ### Ephraim John Gestupa

 

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For more information, please contact:

Dr. Alma A. De Leon

College of Home Science and Industry, CLSU

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

telefax: (044) 456 7212

In our goal to continually improve the services we provide, we would like to get your insights on the second part of the online seminar on Utilization of Indigenous Materials for Mass Production & Farming of Abalone in Palawan you attended. Your views and comments will really help us make our upcoming online seminars and events even more useful and relevant. Please let us know what you think. You can say as little or as much as you'd like.

For those who wish to obtain a certificate of participation, kindly also provide us your email address, where we will send the certificate, through the online evaluation form.

Goat raising is a practical livestockbased enterprise that requires minimal investment but guarantees a good return in a short period of time. However, the lack of quality breeder stock and the high cost of breeding activities are some of the constraints that cause the low rate of local goat production in the country.

 

The price of goat is mainly determined by its genetic size and weight. When it reaches its marketable age, usually at eight months, a native goat, weighing 16 kilos can be sold at Php 1,600 while an upgraded goat or a goat of good breed, weighing 30 kilos is double the price.

 

To improve the genes of goats, Rita T. dela Cruz AI in goat: a farmer needs guaranteed goat breeders. Unfortunately, bucks cost a lot more and are difficult to find. But with artificial insemination (AI), the same benefit is within reach of farmer-entrepreneurs.

 

AI is one of the best technologies being used today as an alternative to natural breeding. It is used to fast track the dissemination of genetic materials from quality breeders to improve the blood composition of farm animals.

 

Although AI is more widelyused for cattle and swine, its use for goat breeding is yet to be fully explored. Many goat raisers are still hesitant in adopting AI in goat due to: 1) unavailability of processed semen, 2) lack of trained inseminators, and 3) absence of a viable industry to support the commercialization of the technology.

 

To address these constraints, the Cagayan Valley Small Ruminants Research Center (CVSRRC) of the Isabela State University implemented the project “Commercialization and Institutionalization of Artificial Insemination for Goats Delivery System in Cagayan Valley.”

 

Funded by the Bureau of Agricultural Research (BAR), the project is headed by Dr. Jonathan Nayga of CVSRRC with the hope of upgrading local stocks that will make the technology accessible to target clients. Specifically, the project aimed to increase the production of processed goat semen intended for AI and to train more technicians who will facilitate the delivery of insemination services to intended clients.

 

After the project was initiated in 2012, it is now producing benefits not only to direct beneficiaries but to the goat industry as a whole. After the development of AI protocols, the project was able to sustain the upgrading of stocks for the production of quality slaughter goats in the Cagayan Valley region through technology commercialization and institutionalization activities.

 

Increasing availability of frozen semen

Through the AI technology, frozen semen from a buck is thawed and then inserted or deposited into the cervix of a doe in heat. If the necessary equipment is available, the use of frozen semen is much less expensive than paying a breeding fee.

 

For this project, the ISU-AI Goat Semen Processing Laboratory was tapped for semen processing. Part of the project activities was the purchase of breeder bucks of pure breed to increase the production of processed frozen semen.

 

As part of the commercialization initiative, the laboratory at ISU is selling frozen semen of Boer, Anglo-Nubian, and Toggenburg breeds to private raisers and commercial farms. Much of these genetic materials have already reached parts of Northern Luzon and even Central Visayas.

 

Training inseminators

Capacity-building activities for AI service providers are important components of the project. These come in the forms of trainings and implementation of a technology orientation program. Participants were provided with start-up kits for insemination. Sixty-seven AI service providers in Cagayan Valley underwent the training on AI and conducted 1,211 inseminations.

 

Today, the technicians are continuously providing insemination services to qualified does. Provision of AI services has become an additional source of income for them. It also provides the means to sustain the upgrading of stocks for the production of quality slaughter to pigs because it influences average daily gain negatively, and increases feed conversion. Soybean feed meals prepared for native livestock are the by-products from oil extraction or soy sauce production, otherwise known as whole soybean. Whether or not whole soybean is fermented is one of the variables studied by Dr. Sanchez and her team. Initial results have successfully proven that fermented soybean leads to positive effects on native pig’s gastrointestinal and respiratory systems.

 

Study three and four of Dr. Sanchez’s research project looked into the effect of soybean feed formulations to the reproductive performance of female native pigs. Soybean contains compounds called phytoestrogens. Phytoestrogens have a similar make-up of human estrogens, the compound released in a woman’s body that regulates her menstrual cycle.

 

Foreign studies conducted with rodents have shown that high dietary intakes of soy isoflavones (phytoestrogens in soybean) resulted in the increase of uterine and ovarian weight as well as higher levels of follicle stimulating hormones. Even Dr. Sanchez herself has conducted similar tests on rodents at the Nutraceutical Research Laboratory, a BARfunded research facility in PSAU.

 

Dr. Sanchez and her colleagues are now analyzing initial data of the changes in a native pig’s reproductive cycle under various soybean feed formulations. The research tested the hypotheses of Dr. Sanchez that if fed with soybean, female native pigs will have prolonged estrus or “heat period” therefore increasing gilt’s potential for pregnancy.

 

During one of the bureau’s monitoring activities in Region 3, Jacob Sanchez who is a member of the project team expressed the need for studying the pig’s reproductive performance because Philippine native breeds have irregular estrus. Developing an enhanced and all-natural soybean feed meal can potentially be useful in improving the reproductive performance of native pig.

 

This component of the study can be attributed as research efforts towards genetic conservation of native animals. According to Dr. Sanchez, raisers of native pigs crossbreed their stock with commercial breeds in order to produce bigger livestock. While this is more profitable, it puts at risk the genetic diversity of native pigs which can potentially lead to extinction. But studies like that of Dr. Sanchez aimed to conserve biodiversity while at the same time, address the needs of farmers who want to augment their income through native pig raising. ### Rita T. dela Cruz

 

For more information:

Dr. Geraldine C. Sanchez

Project Leader

Pampanga State Agricultural University

(045) 866 0800

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.